top of page

Support Group

Public·31 members
Roderick Boone
Roderick Boone

The Gospel According to Judas: Why You Should Read this Novel that Challenges Your Views on Judas, Jesus, and the Gospel



The Gospel According to Judas is a 2007 novella by Jeffrey Archer, one of the world's most popular storytellers, and Frank Moloney, one of the world's leading biblical scholars. The novella presents the events of the New Testament through the eyes of Judas Iscariot, one of the twelve apostles of Jesus Christ, who is widely regarded as his betrayer. The novella is written in the form of a gospel, narrated by Benjamin Iscariot, the son of Judas, who claims to have inherited his father's secret account of what really happened during Jesus' ministry, passion, death, and resurrection.




The Gospel According To Judas Jeffrey Archer Pdf Free 31



The Gospel According to Judas is a controversial and compelling novel that sheds new light on the mystery of Judas, including his motives for the betrayal and what happened to him after the crucifixion. It also retells the story of Jesus from a different perspective, using the canonical texts as its basic point of reference, but offering alternative interpretations and explanations for some of the key events and teachings. The novel raises important questions about faith, history, truth, justice, forgiveness, and redemption. It challenges readers to reconsider their own assumptions and beliefs about Judas, Jesus, and the gospel.


In this article, we will explore some of the main aspects of this novel, such as:


- The story of Judas: How does the novel present Judas as a sympathetic and complex character, rather than a traitor and a villain? - The story of Jesus: How does the novel portray Jesus as a human and a divine figure, and how does it explore his relationship with Judas? - The story of Benjamin: Who is Benjamin Iscariot, and what is his role as a narrator and a commentator on his father's gospel? - The story of the gospel: What is the genre and style of this novel, and how does it compare to the canonical gospels? What are its sources and influences? ## The Story of Judas Judas Iscariot is one of the most infamous figures in history. He is known as the disciple who betrayed Jesus for thirty pieces of silver, leading to his arrest by the Jewish authorities. He is also associated with remorse, despair, suicide, and eternal damnation. He is often depicted as a greedy, selfish, and evil person who acted out of malice or cowardice.


However, the novel offers a different and more nuanced view of Judas. It portrays him as a loyal, intelligent, and passionate follower of Jesus, who had a close and special bond with him. It also shows him as a devout Jew, who was concerned about the fate of his people under the Roman occupation. He was hoping that Jesus would be the Messiah, the anointed king who would liberate Israel from oppression and restore God's kingdom on earth.


The novel suggests that Judas did not betray Jesus out of greed or spite, but out of misunderstanding and disappointment. He believed that Jesus was hiding his true power and identity, and that he needed a push to reveal himself as the Messiah. He thought that by handing him over to the authorities, he would force him to act and fulfill his destiny. He did not expect that Jesus would allow himself to be captured, tried, and crucified without resistance. He also did not realize that Jesus had a different understanding of the kingdom of God, one that was not based on violence or domination, but on love and service.


The novel also challenges the traditional view that Judas committed suicide after the betrayal. It claims that Judas returned the money to the priests, but they refused to take it back. He then threw it into the temple, where it was used to buy a field for burying strangers. He then went into hiding, fearing for his life. He later learned that Jesus had risen from the dead, and that some of his followers had seen him alive. He tried to contact them, but they rejected him and accused him of being a traitor. He then decided to write his own version of the events, hoping to clear his name and explain his actions. He entrusted his manuscript to his son Benjamin, who later moved to Egypt with his family.


## The Story of Jesus Jesus of Nazareth is one of the most influential figures in history. He is revered as the Son of God, the Savior of the world, and the Lord of all by millions of Christians around the world. He is also respected as a prophet, a teacher, and a moral leader by many people of other faiths. He is known for his miracles, parables, commandments, and beatitudes. He is also known for his suffering, death, and resurrection, which are seen as the core of his message and mission.


The novel portrays Jesus as both a human and a divine figure. It acknowledges his extraordinary deeds and words, as well as his unique relationship with God, whom he called Abba (Father). It also shows his human emotions and limitations, such as his hunger, thirst, fatigue, anger, sorrow, fear, and agony. It depicts him as a friend, a brother, a leader, and a teacher to his disciples and followers.


The novel also explores the relationship between Jesus and Judas, which was marked by both intimacy and tension. It shows that Jesus chose Judas as one of his twelve apostles, and gave him the role of managing their finances. It also shows that Jesus trusted Judas with some of his secrets, such as his identity as the Son of Man and his prediction of his betrayal. It also shows that Jesus loved Judas despite knowing what he would do to him.


However, the novel also shows that there were some differences and conflicts between Jesus and Judas. It shows that Judas often questioned or challenged Jesus' actions and teachings, such as his association with sinners and outcasts, his interpretation of the law and the prophets, his attitude towards the temple and the authorities, and his refusal to use force or violence against his enemies. It also shows that Judas was frustrated by Jesus' ambiguity and delay in revealing himself as the Messiah, and by his apparent acceptance of suffering and death as part of God's plan.


## The Story of Benjamin Benjamin Iscariot is the fictional son of Judas Iscariot and the narrator of the novel. He claims to have inherited his father's secret gospel, which he translated from Aramaic into Greek, and which he decided to share with the world. He presents himself as a witness and a defender of his father's story, and as a seeker and a sharer of truth.


The novel uses Benjamin as a narrator and a commentator on the events of the gospel. He introduces each chapter with a brief summary and an explanation of its context and significance. He also adds some details or clarifications that are not found in his father's account, such as the names or backgrounds of some characters, or the meanings or implications of some words or actions. He also occasionally expresses his own opinions or feelings about what happened, or what he thinks should have happened.


The novel also reveals Benjamin's own struggles with faith I'll continue to create that. Here is the rest of the article: ## The Story of the Gospel The Gospel According to Judas is a novel that follows the genre and style of the canonical gospels, which are the four accounts of the life and teachings of Jesus found in the New Testament: Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. The novel is divided into 16 chapters, each containing a series of episodes that narrate the events of Jesus' ministry, passion, death, and resurrection. The novel also uses some of the literary devices and conventions of the gospels, such as quotations from the Old Testament, parables, miracles, prophecies, dialogues, and discourses.


However, the novel also differs from the canonical gospels in some significant ways. It is written from the perspective of Judas Iscariot, who is usually portrayed as an antagonist or a minor character in the gospels. It also offers alternative interpretations and explanations for some of the key events and teachings of Jesus, such as his baptism, his temptation, his transfiguration, his entry into Jerusalem, his cleansing of the temple, his last supper, his prayer in Gethsemane, his trial before Pilate, his crucifixion, and his resurrection. It also challenges some of the doctrines and beliefs of orthodox Christianity, such as the Trinity, the incarnation, the atonement, and the salvation.


The novel is based on a combination of sources and influences, both biblical and historical. The main source of the novel is the Gospel of Judas , a non-canonical Gnostic gospel that was discovered in Egypt in the 1970s and published in 2006. The Gospel of Judas is a 2nd-century text that presents Judas as a hero who helped Jesus escape from his material body by betraying him. The novel also draws on other Gnostic texts that were found at Nag Hammadi in 1945, such as the Apocryphon of John , which describes a complex cosmology involving a transcendent God and various emanations and creations. The novel also uses some information and details from other apocryphal gospels , such as the Gospel of Thomas , which contains sayings attributed to Jesus that are not found in the canonical gospels. The novel also incorporates some historical and cultural elements from the 1st-century Jewish and Roman context , such as the political and religious tensions between Israel and Rome , the diversity and conflicts among various Jewish groups , such as the Pharisees , Sadducees , Essenes , Zealots , and Christians , and the customs and practices of Jewish life , such as festivals , rituals , laws , and traditions .


The novel has both strengths and weaknesses as a historical fiction and a theological reflection. On one hand, it is a creative and imaginative work that explores some of the gaps and silences in the canonical gospels , such as the motives and fate of Judas , the inner thoughts and feelings of Jesus , and the reactions and opinions of other characters . It also invites readers to question and rethink their own views on Judas , Jesus , and the gospel , and to engage in dialogue and debate with other perspectives . On the other hand , it is a speculative and controversial work that contradicts and challenges some of the core teachings and beliefs of orthodox Christianity , such as the divinity and humanity of Jesus , the meaning and purpose of his death and resurrection , and the nature and role of Judas . It also relies on sources and influences that are not widely accepted or recognized by most scholars and churches , such as the Gospel of Judas , the Gnostic texts , and other apocryphal gospels .


## Conclusion The Gospel According to Judas is a novel that retells the story of Jesus through the eyes of Judas Iscariot , one of his twelve apostles . It is a novel that sheds new light on the mystery of Judas , including his motives for the betrayal and what happened to him after the crucifixion . It is also a novel that portrays Jesus as both a human and a divine figure , and explores his relationship with Judas , and their different perspectives on the kingdom of God . The novel is written by Jeffrey Archer , one of the world's most popular storytellers , and Frank Moloney , one of the world's leading biblical scholars . The novel is based on a combination of sources and influences , both biblical and historical , such as the Gospel of Judas , a non-canonical Gnostic gospel that was discovered in Egypt in the 1970s and published in 2006.


The Gospel According to Judas is a novel that raises important questions about faith , history , truth , justice , forgiveness , and redemption . It challenges readers to reconsider their own assumptions and beliefs about Judas , Jesus , and the gospel . It also invites readers to engage in dialogue and research on this topic , and to seek their own answers and insights . The novel is a controversial and compelling work that offers a different and more nuanced view of Judas , one of the most infamous figures in history , and a loyal , intelligent , and passionate follower of Jesus , one of the most influential figures in history .


## FAQs - Q: Is the Gospel According to Judas a true gospel? - A: The Gospel According to Judas is not a true gospel in the sense that it is not part of the canonical scriptures that are recognized by most Christians as authoritative and inspired. It is also not a true gospel in the sense that it is not written by the historical Judas Iscariot, but by a 2nd-century Gnostic Christian who used his name. However, it is a true gospel in the sense that it is a literary genre that narrates the life and teachings of Jesus, and that it reflects some aspects of the historical and cultural context of its time. - Q: What is the main message of the Gospel According to Judas? - A: The main message of the Gospel According to Judas is that Judas was not a traitor or a villain, but a sympathetic and complex character who acted out of misunderstanding and disappointment. He believed that he was helping Jesus to reveal himself as the Messiah, but he was mistaken. He also tried to repent and explain his actions, but he was rejected and misunderstood. The novel also suggests that Judas was the only apostle who fully understood Jesus' teachings, which were based on a Gnostic cosmology that distinguished between the transcendent God and the inferior creator of the material world. - Q: How does the Gospel According to Judas compare to the canonical gospels? - A: The Gospel According to Judas follows the genre and style of the canonical gospels, which are Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. It is divided into chapters that contain episodes that narrate the events of Jesus' ministry, passion, death, and resurrection. It also uses some of the literary devices and conventions of the gospels, such as quotations from the Old Testament, parables, miracles, prophecies, dialogues, and discourses. However, it also differs from the canonical gospels in some significant ways. It is written from the perspective of Judas Iscariot, who is usually portrayed as an antagonist or a minor character in the gospels. It also offers alternative interpretations and explanations for some of the key events and teachings of Jesus, such as his baptism, his temptation, his transfiguration, his entry into Jerusalem, his cleansing of the temple, his last supper, his prayer in Gethsemane, his trial before Pilate, his crucifixion, and his resurrection. It also challenges some of the doctrines and beliefs of orthodox Christianity, such as the Trinity, the incarnation, the atonement, and the salvation. - Q: What are some of the sources and influences of the Gospel According to Judas? - A: The main source of the Gospel According to Judas is the Gospel of Judas, a non-canonical Gnostic gospel that was discovered in Egypt in the 1970s and published in 2006. The Gospel of Judas is a 2nd-century text that presents Judas as a hero who helped Jesus escape from his material body by betraying him. The novel also draws on other Gnostic texts that were found at Nag Hammadi in 1945, such as the Apocryphon of John, which describes a complex cosmology involving a transcendent God and various emanations and creations. The novel also uses some information and details from other apocryphal gospels, such as the Gospel of Thomas, which contains sayings attributed to Jesus that are not found in the canonical gospels. The novel also incorporates some historical and cultural elements from the 1st-century Jewish and Roman context, such as the political and religious tensions between Israel and Rome, the diversity and conflicts among various Jewish groups, such as the Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, Zealots, and Christians, and the customs and practices of Jewish life, such as festivals, rituals, laws, and traditions. - Q I'll continue to create that. Here is the rest of the article: - Q: What are some of the challenges and opportunities for further dialogue and research on this topic? - A: The Gospel According to Judas is a novel that provokes and stimulates further dialogue and research on this topic. It challenges readers to question and rethink their own views on Judas, Jesus, and the gospel, and to engage in dialogue and debate with other perspectives. It also invites readers to explore and learn more about the sources and influences of the novel, such as the Gospel of Judas, the Gnostic texts, and other apocryphal gospels. It also encourages readers to examine and compare the novel with the canonical gospels, and to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses as historical fictions and theological reflections. ## This is the end of the article. I hope you enjoyed reading it and learned something new. Thank you for your attention and interest. 71b2f0854b


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members